COMMUNITY ONE BLOG

Community One Foundation Event at Award-Winning Integral House a Sold Out Success

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On Saturday, November 19, 2016, over 250 members and allies of the LGBTTIQQ2S community filled Toronto’s award-winning Integral House to enjoy an evening of celebration and performances in support of Community One Foundation. Hosted by Canadian comedian Carla Collins and sponsored by RBC and Team PK, the evening was a decadent affair, complemented by custom Bar Chef cocktails and gourmet delights.

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VIP guests arrived at 6:30 p.m. and were treated to an exclusive tour of Integral House by Brigitte Shim of Shim-Sutcliffe Architects, along with performances by the world-renowned Opera Atelier. At 7:30 p.m., the event opened to the public and showcased a variety of performances from Community One Foundation Rainbow Grant recipient Tessa Goodon and popular Toronto drag artists Sofonda Cox and Donnarama.

In addition, the foundation awarded the winner of their annual Steinert & Ferreiro Award, Canada’s largest single cash award in recognition of leadership in the LGBTTIQQ2S community, to Toronto-based advocate Doug Kerr. Kerr was chosen for his commitment to volunteerism, social activism along with his steadfast ability to drive collaboration across a multitude of initiatives in both a Toronto and global context.

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“Our foundation’s main objective is to support and foster growth throughout LGBTTIQQ2S communities in the greater Toronto area,” says Community One Foundation co-chair Terry Greene. “Events like these help us spotlight the amazing individuals and initiatives that we continue to recognize with grants and awards throughout the calendar year.”

Community One Foundation is one of many charitable organizations that Integral House’s builder James Stewart (late mathematician and textbook magnate) has donated proceeds to. A longtime LGBT activist, Stewart planted roots in the community by inviting “gay rights activist George Hislop to speak at McMaster in the early 1970s, when the LGBT liberation movement was in its infancy, and was involved in protests and demonstrations until mathematics began to dominate his life.” (Daily Xtra, 2014).